40 U.S.C. § 5104 United States Capitol Buildings and Grounds Unlawful Activities

  • occupation of Capitol Grounds roads in a manner that obstructs or hinders their proper use;
  • injury of Capitol Grounds statues, seats, walls, fountains, or other erections or architectural features, or any tree, shrub, plant, or turf;
  • knowingly, with force and violence, entering or remaining on the floor of either House of Congress;
  • willfully and knowingly remaining unauthorized on the floor of either House of Congress or any adjacent cloakroom or lobby;
  • willfully and knowingly entering or remaining in either House’s gallery in violation of rules or authorization for admission;
  • willfully and knowingly entering or remaining in any room in any Capitol Building set aside or designated for use of Congress or the Library of Congress with intent to disrupt the orderly conduct of official business;
  • willfully and knowingly uttering loud, threatening, or abusive language, or engaging in disorderly or disruptive conduct, anywhere on the Capitol Grounds or in Capitol Buildings, with intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of Congress;
  • willfully and knowingly obstructing or impeding passage through or within the Capitol Grounds or Buildings;
  • willfully and knowingly engaging in an act of physical violence (defined as an act involving assault, other infliction or threat of infliction of death or bodily harm to an individual, or damage or destruction of real or personal property) on Capitol Grounds or in Capitol Buildings;
  • willfully and knowingly parading, demonstrating, or picketing in any Capitol Buildings.

18 U.S.C. § 1752 Restricted Buildings or Grounds

18 U.S.C. § 1752 prohibits certain conduct at a “restricted building” or “grounds” (this is defined to include locations where a “person protected by the Secret Service,” such as the Vice President, “is or will be temporarily visiting”).

Conduct prohibited at restricted buildings or grounds includes: (1) knowingly entering or remaining without lawful authority; (2) knowingly engaging in disruptive conduct, or impeding ingress or egress, “with intent to impede or disrupt the orderly conduct of Government Business or official functions;” and (3) knowingly engaging in “any act of physical violence against any person or property.”

Violations of § 1752 are punished by fines and up to one year of imprisonment. The conduct becomes a felony and a maximum sentence of up to ten years applies if the restricted grounds offense also involved a deadly or dangerous weapon or firearm, or resulted in significant bodily injury.



18 U.S.C. § 1361 Vandalism of Government Property

18 U.S.C. § 1361 prohibits willful injury to federal property. Ordinarily, a violation of this statute is a misdemeanor subject to fines and a maximum prison term of one year. However, if the damage to federal property exceeds $1,000, the offense is treated as a felony, with increased fines and up to ten years of imprisonment.

18 U.S.C. § 641 Theft of Government Property

18 U.S.C. § 641 makes it a crime to steal “any record, voucher, money, or thing of value of the United States or of any department or agency thereof.” If the property stolen is worth less than $1,000, the offense is a misdemeanor that is punished by a maximum prison term of one year. Offenses involving property of greater value are felonies and punished by up to ten years of imprisonment.

 

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